High Five: October

October 6, 2014 / High Five

By Alex Reeves

Some top-class advertising to restore your faith in the industry.

Good advertising deals in the new and the different. But some of our rundown of this month’s best advertising features some familiar ideas, proving that with the right approach and a good helping of flair, familiar ideas can still be powerful.

Brand: Channel 4 / Cancer Research UK
Title: It’s Payback Time
Production Company: Nexus Productions
Director: Smith & Foulkes
Production Company Producer: Tracey Cooper
Ad Agency: 4Creative
Creative Director: Chris Bovill
Art Director: Daniel Burgess
Creative: Pablo Gonzalez de la Pena
Agency Producer: Shananne Lane
Editing Company: Trim
Editor: Paul Hardcastle
Music Company: SIREN
Music Producers: Sean Atherton, Siân Rogers
Sound Company: Factory
Sound Designers: Tom Joyce, Dan Beckwith, Anthony Moore

Channel 4 / Cancer Research UK – It’s Payback Time

Delivering a contagious apocalypse to city of cancerous cells is quite an odd idea for a commercial promoting an anti-cancer comedy fundraising event, but then neither Channel 4 or Cancer Research UK have been playing by the rules for quite some time with their advertising. It’s a strangely violent idea, focusing on anger more than the usual sympathy, but if you can’t hate cancer what can you hate? And of course Smith & Foulkes have brought this malignant civilisation to life in beautiful detail. It really gets you hyped up for some good-natured cancer bashing.

 

Brand: Leica
Title: 100
Production Company: Stink
Director: Jones+Tino
Production Company Producer: Victoria Martinez
Director of Photography: Bjorn Charpentier
Ad Agency: F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi
Creative Director: Fabio Fernandes, Eduardo Lima
Creatives: Bruno Oppido, Romero Cavalcanti, Thiago Carvalho
Agency Producer: Victor Alloza
Sound Company: Satélite Áudio
Sound Designers: Fernanda Costa, Marina Castilho
Post Production Company: Casablanca Effects

Leica – 100

It may seem slightly arrogant to claim that every iconic photograph recreated in this film was taken because of Leica, but despite its heavy-handedness, the voiceover makes a fair point. Released in 1913, the Leica was the first practical 35mm camera that used standard cinema 35mm film, allowing photographers vastly more mobility. But whatever you think of the message, you have to applaud the execution. Jones+Tino cleverly weave some of history’s most significant photographs together into an intriguing montage. You can even test your photographic knowledge for a bit of fun and see how many you can name.

 

Brand: Philips
Title: How Many Years Does it Take to Change a Lightbulb?
Production Company: UNIT9
Director: Martin Stirling
Production Company Producer: Dale Healy
Director of Photography: Carl Burke
Ad Agency: IRIS Worldwide
Creative Directors: Chris Baylis, Matt Hallet
Creatives: Pete Sanna, Matt Weston
Editing Company: UNIT9
Editor: Alex Burt

Philips – How Many Years Does it Take to Change a Lightbulb?

These compressed history concepts do wheel around pretty frequently, but that’s because they’re so useful for brands, allowing assert the idea that they fit into the bigger picture – that they’re playing the long game. This one is beautifully realised by Martin Stirling and the clever folks at UNIT9, seamlessly passing through a series of easily identifiable decades. It’s certainly a neat idea, expertly made. Whether colour-variable lighting like this will catch on is less certain, but it looks pretty cool.

 

Brand: RFU
Title: Team Talk
Production Company: Academy Films
Director: Peter Cattaneo
Production Company Producer: Juliette Harris
Director of Photography: Ben Fordesman
Ad Agency: BBH Sport
Creative Director: Ewan Paterson
Creatives: Lewis Mooney, Ed Cole
Agency Producer: Davud Karbassioun
Editing Company: The Quarry
Editor: Scot Crane
Sound Company: Wave Studios
Post Production Company: The Mill

RFU – Team Talk

This commercial is actually a very simple idea, to the credit of its creators. But that doesn’t make it easy to pull off. It rests largely on one thing – the acting chops of Mr Charles Dance, currently best known as Machiavellian family man Tywin Lannister in Game of Thrones. Armed with a great script, he’s managed to deliver his speech with just the right balance of gravitas and humour – a difficult mix to master. He’s definitely much easier to like here than his counterpart in Westeros.

 

Brand: Volkswagen
Title: Priorities
Production Company: Outsider
Director: James Rouse
Production Company Producer: Benji Howell
Director of Photography: Tim Maurice-Jones
Ad Agency: adam&eveDDB
Creative Director: Jeremy Craigen
Creatives: Nikki Lindman, Toby Brewer
Agency Producer: Panos Louca
Editing Company: Work Post
Editor: Neil Smith
Music Supervision: SIREN
Music Supervisors: Sean Atherton, Siân Rogers
Sound Company: Factory
Sound Designer: Anthony Moore
Post Production Company: MPC

Volkswagen – Priorities

This idea is pretty low-key too, focusing on the small sacrifices fathers make for their children. But of course they’ve got the right director for the job in James Rouse – a man who’s made a name for himself over the past year or so as the master of understated, empathetic comedy. There are no gags, just a series of familiar scenes, recreated in a way we can all recognise. Mr Everyman is well cast and does a great job at subtly conveying the little emotions we can all identify with.

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